Health Benefits of Pooping Correctly

Pooping is something that many of us have been doing naturally since we were babies. Like breathing it’s something that our bodies are programmed to do and we don’t have to worry too much about it. However, the culture that we were raised in can determine how we poop and it might not be the most optimal for our health.

Sitting Versus Squatting

Most people who have grown up in western culture are used to sitting on a throne toilet and it’s easy to think that is how everyone else in the world does it too. But that isn’t the case! Many other cultures squat to poop. If both methods of pooping allow us to relieve ourselves is there really a right way to poop and a wrong way?

Yes!

Studies have shown squatting to poop might be healthier for us — and that is why we created the Stoolie! It is the best toilet stool for helping you to get into the position of squatting while sitting on your toilet.

Health Benefits of Pooping Correctly

According to recent studies, squatting to poop puts your colon in the ideal position to empty your bowels. Sitting, however, puts a kink in your bowel which can lead to straining and not fully eliminating. Like a garden hose that has a bend in it, more water pressure has to be used to help water travel through the hose, the same is true for your bowels.

This kink in your bowels when you’re not in the bathroom has a purpose: it helps keep your stool inside until you're ready to relieve yourself. This kink essentially helps to avoid accidents. But (no pun intended) when it’s time to use the bathroom, it’s time to remove the kink!

The #1 plastic-free artisanal toilet stool

 

Technically Speaking

As your body digests food, stool collects in your rectum — a chamber at the end of your large intestine. A muscle called the puborectalis, a U-shaped muscle, wraps around your rectum and creates the kink that we discussed earlier. When you are ready to eliminate your bowels, this muscle relaxes and allows your rectum to contract and release your stool.

Unfortunately, when you sit on a throne toilet, the puborectalis isn’t able to completely relax and so doesn’t allow your bowels to fully straighten out, making it harder to poop, and causing you to strain, and maybe even not fully empty your bowels.

More than just a pretty toilet stool.

Icon of poop

Enjoy better poops.

Stoolie adjusts your bowel to the perfect pooping position for quicker, easier and more complete eliminations.

For optimal expulsion, sit on the toilet with your knees positioned higher than your hips. You can use a footstool to help you achieve this position. An October 2018 study published in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology suggests this really can help. The study involved 52 men and women. Of these volunteers, 44 percent strained while pooping and 29 percent had trouble completely emptying their bowels. Over the course of four weeks, researchers tracked more than 1,100 bowel movements, including 384 that were facilitated with a footstool. They found that using a stool enabled 71 percent of participants to poop more quickly and 90 percent did so with greater ease.

Icon of bowelsMaintain bowel health

By reducing strain on the bowel, Stoolie helps maintain the shape and tone of the bowel.

The history of the pedestal toilet dates back to 1738, when JF Brondel introduced the valve-type flush toilet (Pathak, 1995). Interestingly enough, Brondel was an English architect, not a physician nor an anatomist. The flush toilet he introduced underwent numerous “improvements” in the years to follow. However, none of these changes had anything to do with the anatomy of the human body.

Squatting is the natural position for eliminating waste; if not for toilets, we would innately squat to poop. But a toilet is made for sitting on, and it's inadvisable to attempt to squat on one. A toilet stool, however, bridges the gap between squatting and sitting.

By elevating the knees above the hips, a position called "flexing", the bowel conforms to a position comparable to squatting. The flex position benefits the body in four ways:

  1. Facilitates more complete elimination
  2. Reduces the need to strain
  3. Straightens the pathway to the anus by releasing the bend in the sigmoid colon
  4. Protects the integrity of the shape and tone of the bowel, helping to prevent common structural bowel issues such as impaction, diverticula, anal fissures and hemorrhoids.

Further, some research suggests that sitting to poop can be a contributing factor to developing IBS, appendicitis, and colorectal cancer (Dimmer et al., 1996; Tobin, 1996; Online posting, n.d.).

Icon of a super heroFeel Amazing

Bowel health is linked to immunity and mental health.
The human gut is more complex than previously thought and has a huge impact on whole-body health. A healthy gut contributes to a strong immune system, heart health, brain health, improved mood, healthy sleep, and effective digestion, and it may help prevent some cancers and autoimmune diseases.

The incredible complexity of the gut and its importance to our overall health is a topic of increasing research in the medical community. Numerous studies in the past two decades have demonstrated links between gut health and the immune system, mood, mental health, autoimmune diseases, endocrine disorders, skin conditions, and cancer.

Image of a guy using a stoolie

At one time, our digestive system was considered a relatively “simple” body system, comprised essentially of one long tube for our food to pass through, be absorbed, and then excreted.

Many facets of modern life such as high stress levels, too little sleep, eating processed and high-sugar foods, and taking antibiotics can all damage our gut microbiome. This in turn may affect other aspects of our health, such as the brain, heart, immune system, skin, weight, hormone levels, ability to absorb nutrients, and even the development of cancer.

For optimal expulsion, sit on the toilet with your knees positioned higher than your hips. You can use a footstool to help you achieve this position. An October 2018 study published in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology suggests this really can help. The study involved 52 men and women. Of these volunteers, 44 percent strained while pooping and 29 percent had trouble completely emptying their bowels. Over the course of four weeks, researchers tracked more than 1,100 bowel movements, including 384 that were facilitated with a footstool. They found that using a stool enabled 71 percent of participants to poop more quickly and 90 percent did so with greater ease.

See "You've Been Pooping Wrong Your Whole Life"